Movies, books, great detectives and coffee breaks.
A blog dedicated to some of my favorite things.
Sherlock Holmes
Hercule Poirot
The Phantom of the Opera
The Cat and the Canary
and so on...

Most of the images posted here are believed to be in the public domain.

20th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Fuck yeah Murder Mysteries! with 54 notes

Tagged: Hercule PoirotCaptain HastingsCurtain2013reblog

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Source: almaviva90

19th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Débris de Rêves with 432 notes

feuille-d-automne:

Agatha Christie à Paris , 1906 .

feuille-d-automne:

Agatha Christie à Paris , 1906 .

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17th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Pleased to meet you... with 21 notes

eatacrocodile:

Movies to watch over and over again

Murder on the Orient Express, 1974

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15th September 2014

Link reblogged from with 20 notes

Forget the Haters: Agatha Christie for Life →

blackballoonpublishing:

image

“Good reactionary fun.” That’s how Robert Barnard, an English crime writer, critic and lecturer, described The Secret Adversary, Agatha Christie’s second novel and her first dip into espionage fiction. The book, which tells the tale of two “Bright Young Things” of the Jazz Age and their…

Tagged: Agatha ChristieBirthdayHappy Birthdayreblog

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13th September 2014

Photoset with 122 notes

Christine, Raoul and the Persian

Tagged: the phantom of the opera19251920sawesome silentslon chaneymary philbinnorman kerryarthur careweraoulchristine daaethe persiandarogalon chaney phantomsilent filmsilent movievintageold hollywoodold hollywood in colormy gifs

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13th September 2014

Photoset with 3 notes

Watching Rodolfo Valentino - La leggenda — an Italian miniseries about the silent film star who is played by Gabriel Garko.

So far I’ve only seen one episode and I’m looking forward to seeing more .

Bottom — a photo of Gabriel and a photo of Rudi.

Tagged: Gabriel Garko.Rudolph Valentino2013Rodolfo Valentino - La leggendaAsia ARgento is in the miniseries tooI'd love to see someone as Norman Kerry who was Rudi's friendBut from what I've seen he isn't included ...

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12th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Don't Let The World See Your Love with 499 notes

the-wandering-wanderer:

#NOTDEAD
On Tuesday, September 12, 1995, Jeremy Brett died in his sleep, at his home overlooking Clapham Common. It’s been nineteen years since the world lost a truly remarkable soul; nineteen years since the world has became just that much more colder and unfriendlier without him. The cause of his death was heart failure, hastened by the repercussions of rheumatic fever he suffered as a child, and the pills he was taking to help him cope with his bi-polar disorder. Renowned for his generosity of spirit, delightful laughter, beautiful voice, and the handsome presence, lively manner and moody sensuality of many of his acting roles, Jeremy poured his heart and soul into life.
It is entirely unjust, then, that such a man had to suffer in so many ways throughout his sixty one years. I know there are countless people that pass away every day, fighting bitter struggles of their own, and I don’t know they exist, and will never meet. That is why it is perhaps strange to feel so deeply affected by the death of someone I did not know, but Jeremy has become very dear to me.  His made lasting impact on the lives of so many people, mind very profoundly and I appreciate that endlessly. So his death especially makes me feel cheated: I will never have the chance to shake his hand and thank him for his inspiring words and convictions; I will never have the chance to chat with him, maybe offer a joke or two, just to see his radiant smile; he will never have the chance to see how endearing and flawless his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes has become, how readily people embrace it with open arms; he will never know exactly how many lives he has touched, even more so as time has passed. Mostly, I feel cheated because I think Jeremy deserved every bit as much of the happiness as he caused by being simply perfect (and I do not use the word lightly-the world will likely never see a man of such excellence again), yet he knew more hardship than happiness.I suppose this is what gives us that bittersweet joy when we appreciate his art: Jeremy’s uniqueness and passion, dedication and stoicism are a warm reminder to us that “the show must go on!” Indeed it must, even in times as difficult as the world finds itself in at the moment. And that, I think, is the fundamental principal of Sherlock Holmes, and the brilliant man who portrayed him: hope. As double-zero-agent-alison so succinctly put it: "The spark of his brilliance, kindness, tireless devotion to his work and gentle, open soul lives on."Jeremy Brett, I hope you know some way just how much you are deeply respected, loved, and missed. I hope you’ve found peace in that place that is the greatest mystery to the living, and I hope you’ve solved that mystery. And I hope that you will continue to be remembered with great fondness. Although you can’t be resurrected quite the same way Sherlock Holmes was, I think it would be well to keep in mind Edward Hardwicke’s words which prove you are really #notdead:
"Someone once said that no one ever leaves us as long as they are remembered. Jeremy Brett will always be remembered, along with the pleasure, the excitement and the laughter he brought to us all."

the-wandering-wanderer:

#NOTDEAD

On Tuesday, September 12, 1995, Jeremy Brett died in his sleep, at his home overlooking Clapham Common. It’s been nineteen years since the world lost a truly remarkable soul; nineteen years since the world has became just that much more colder and unfriendlier without him. The cause of his death was heart failure, hastened by the repercussions of rheumatic fever he suffered as a child, and the pills he was taking to help him cope with his bi-polar disorder. Renowned for his generosity of spirit, delightful laughter, beautiful voice, and the handsome presence, lively manner and moody sensuality of many of his acting roles, Jeremy poured his heart and soul into life.

It is entirely unjust, then, that such a man had to suffer in so many ways throughout his sixty one years. I know there are countless people that pass away every day, fighting bitter struggles of their own, and I don’t know they exist, and will never meet. That is why it is perhaps strange to feel so deeply affected by the death of someone I did not know, but Jeremy has become very dear to me.  His made lasting impact on the lives of so many people, mind very profoundly and I appreciate that endlessly. So his death especially makes me feel cheated: I will never have the chance to shake his hand and thank him for his inspiring words and convictions; I will never have the chance to chat with him, maybe offer a joke or two, just to see his radiant smile; he will never have the chance to see how endearing and flawless his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes has become, how readily people embrace it with open arms; he will never know exactly how many lives he has touched, even more so as time has passed. Mostly, I feel cheated because I think Jeremy deserved every bit as much of the happiness as he caused by being simply perfect (and I do not use the word lightly-the world will likely never see a man of such excellence again), yet he knew more hardship than happiness.

I suppose this is what gives us that bittersweet joy when we appreciate his art: Jeremy’s uniqueness and passion, dedication and stoicism are a warm reminder to us that “the show must go on!” Indeed it must, even in times as difficult as the world finds itself in at the moment. And that, I think, is the fundamental principal of Sherlock Holmes, and the brilliant man who portrayed him: hope. As double-zero-agent-alison so succinctly put it: 

"The spark of his brilliance, kindness, tireless devotion to his work and gentle, open soul lives on."

Jeremy Brett, I hope you know some way just how much you are deeply respected, loved, and missed. I hope you’ve found peace in that place that is the greatest mystery to the living, and I hope you’ve solved that mystery. And I hope that you will continue to be remembered with great fondness. Although you can’t be resurrected quite the same way Sherlock Holmes was, I think it would be well to keep in mind Edward Hardwicke’s words which prove you are really #notdead:

"Someone once said that no one ever leaves us as long as they are remembered. Jeremy Brett will always be remembered, along with the pleasure, the excitement and the laughter he brought to us all."

Tagged: Remembering you 19 years later Jeremyreblog

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10th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from BAD WOLF with 3,365 notes

gallifreyan-detective:

Hannibal & Sherlock
└  Charles Augustus Magnussen pays a visit to the infamous Hannibal Lecter.

Requested by Anon.

Tagged: The Mikkelsen brothersReblogHannibal LecterCharles Augustus Magnussen

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10th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Sunday Night Masterpiece with 26 notes

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9th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Movies, books, great detectives and coffee breaks. with 2 notes

rookheeya:

Is the patient faking ?
House MD
Season 6 Episode 19 The Choice

rookheeya:

Is the patient faking ?

House MD

Season 6 Episode 19 The Choice

Tagged: househouse mdHugh Lauriemy gifs

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